1. Katie G

    March 6, 2012 by Ross Weene

    “Fast, fun and easy to sail”; these were the requirements for “Katie G”, an exciting 40-foot family cruising boat built by Eric Goetz Custom Sailboats for Eric’s own use, and named after his daughter. The design is strongly influenced by the fresh approach of unrestricted Open Class shorthanded offshore racers, which contributed such features as waterballast, twin rudders, the plumb stem and the rig.

    Waterballast, in two fore-and-aft tanks each side, increases sail carrying power for speed and reduces heel and dampens motions for comfort. The twin, canted rudders present a near-vertical control surface on either tack when heeled and provide great steering control when running and reaching, unlike a single rudder whose steering effect is reduced as heel increases. Twin rudders have proved their effectiveness on long distance Open Class racers such as our own 60′ BOC boats “DURACELL” and “GRINAKER”. The plumb stem, as well as imparting a certain “look” to the boat, makes for a fine, wave-piercing entry and lengthens the waterline, improving speed and easing motion. Plumb stems also provide greater reserve buoyancy forward, for a given length, and better support anchor and headstay weights.

    THE RIG

    The sail plan is set up for fast sailing and easy handling. The biggest jib is a number 3, just overlapping for easy tacking without winch-grinding (if you time it right), and is set on a fractional, furling headstay. Asymmetrical spinnakers, one each hoisted to hounds (950 sq.ft) or masthead (1500 sq.ft), are tacked to the spinnaker pole which extends four feet beyond the bow and is retained in a yoke on the bow pulpit when reaching. The longer pole used conventionally, projects the asymmetricals when running. The fully battened mainsail uses a traveller abaft the tiller with the sheets close at hand to the helmsman. Swept-back spreaders and full-beam chainplates make for a well-stayed, low-compression spar, with runners needed only in extreme conditions, when they are brought back to tracks on deck, “Star”-boat style. Mast and sail control lines lead to jammers and winches on the house-top each side of the companionway and sheet winches are well forward in the cockpit, handy to the helmsman and easily reached from the protected position behind the dodger. The dodger itself has a fixed arch, allowing the forward and after sections to be folded independently and forming the basis for a cockpit tent.

    ON DECK

    The cockpit has some practical features aimed at cruising enjoyment. The two middle pushpit stanchions form a ladder which swings out over the transom between the twin rudders making a swimming platform over the water, an extension of the cockpit sole. A door in the port side of the transom contains a cylindrical Force 10 propane barbecue which slides out on a track to hang over the water for cooking meals at anchor. A hand shower is kept in a locker opposite, on the starboard side, so you can stand on the swimming platform and shower off salt from swimming or sand from the beach. The low coamings in the ten foot long cockpit are specially sculpted for comfortable lower back support. The port seat gives access to a large cockpit locker, and behind the tiller, the cockpit sole and seats open up to give access to a large “trunk” for stowage of the inflatable dinghy, “cruising toys” and other water? resistant gear. This trunk area is watertight to the interior of the boat.

    “Katie G” is tiller-steered, in keeping with the “big dinghy” approach of her hull and rig. The rudders are steered through a simple custom quadrant and cable system. The rudder blades are in trunks allowing the optimum amount of rudder to be down at any time; the windward rudder can be raised to eliminate its drag and there is adjustment for optimum toe-in or toe-out. The deckhouse has four opening ports each side, and a hatch over the saloon. The forward face of the house has another hatch in it and slopes gently to the foredeck, essentially adding usable deck space. Up in the bow, the foredeck dips below the sheer, recessing the furling drum and the custom carbon-fibre bitts each side (in place of bow cleats). Anchor, mooring and dock lines run through fairleads in the bulwark left by the recessed deck. There is a vertical anchor locker just aft of the dip, to port.

    DOWN BELOW

    Aft, there is a comfortable, well-ventilated double cabin to starboard, and the head is to port. The engine, a 35 hp Yanmar diesel, is under the galley island, sharing its compartment with the ballast pump, and other ancillaries are under the central part of the table. The stove and the counters each side of it are part of a semicircular, gimballing unit at the forward end of the galley. This layout makes for a safe galley; much safer than one in which the stove is either to windward or to leeward of the cook. The fridge/freezer at the aft end of the counter completes a very secure galley. The nav. table and wet? locker (with seat) are opposite the galley, to port. In the saloon, there are long settees each side which will make good sea-berths. Fuel and water tanks are beneath the settees in integral tanks. As one can only walk through the saloon on the port side, the starboard settee makes a nice “backwater” where adults or children can entertain themselves undisturbed by through-traffic.

    The forward cabin has a large hanging locker to port, with a wash-basin and stowage to starboard. There is a seat between the berths with stowage underneath it as well as under the berths. The forward bulkhead is a water-tight collision bulkhead.

    CONSTRUCTION

    “Katie G” is beautifully built of Unidirectional S-glass and Epoxy resin with Airex foam core in the hull and Divinycell in the deck. Framing is mostly formed by the bulkheads and furniture, except in way of the keel. All ring bulkheads and frames are capped with carbon fiber. The joinerwork is all of light cored construction.

    THE WATER-BALLAST SYSTEM

    Waterballast is divided into two tanks each side. They are filled through a scoop that hinges on its aft side and opens like a reversed “Elvstrom” bailer. The ballast water is then diverted to the desired tank by means of guillotine valves and an ingenious system of integral ducting developed by Goetz Custom Sailboats. The aft windward tank would be filled for fast reaching, and both tanks filled for windward work. Before tacking, the leeward tank is filled from the scoop, the boat is then tacked and the new leeward tank is emptied through “bailers” at the low point of each tank. The hydraulic ballast controls are located in the cockpit in reach of the helmsman. The 2,500 lbs of water-ballast each side increases the righting moment by 66% at 20o of heel, so one can see why it has such a marked effect on performance.

    We could not have designed “KATIE G” without creative input from the able people at Goetz Custom Sailboats, Hall Spars and GMT.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Katie G Sailplan (click for .pdf)

    Katie G Composite Plan (click for .pdf)

     


  2. Quadrille

    by Ross Weene

     

    It is always a great opportunity to design a boat for an experienced owner who knows what he wants. Nick Brown and his family have owned several yachts, from the 73′ “Bolero” through Hinckleys and his last boat “Iona”, the first J-44.

    The requirements for “Quadrille” were that she be lighter, a little smaller, and yet as fast as current high-performance 44-footers, but with only 5′-9″ draft, as her owner spends much time in the Chesapeake.

    At first, a fully-ballasted dagger-keel was contemplated, but could not be accommodated within the required interior layout. The ultimate solution was to employ a Collins Tandem Keel with a small board in the aft foil as a “feeler” for Chesapeake mud. The board will be used only in shallow areas, and once raised would allow the skipper to get off, reducing draft by 12″.

    Other special features include a carbon-fibre mast, a retractable bowsprit for projecting big asymmetrical spinnakers, and a full-roached main. All these features give “Quadrille” a very good turn of speed.

    CONSTRUCTION

    Eric Goetz Custom Sailboats built the boat to their usual high standards. Construction is E-glass and epoxy over a lightweight balsa core. Chainplates are composite, essentially a part of the hull, as Goetz does for Maxis and America’s Cup boats.

    RIG

    The main shrouds are out at the full beam, reducing mast and rigging loads. The carbon spar weighs 275 lbs (125 kg) less than an aluminum spar of equivalent stiffness.

    DECK LAYOUT

    The deck layout is a careful evolution of Nick Brown’s previous 44-footer. The bowsprit slides out through a composite “Bull’s-eye” built into the bow. It is on deck so as not to interfere with the Owner’s cabin forward.

    INTERIOR

    Down below, the arrangement is also an evolution of the Owner’s previous boat, with a double cabin aft to starboard, and a head to port. The huge cockpit locker is accessible through the head.

    The galley features a microwave outboard of the 3-burner stove, and has a special locker in the freezer to hold ice-cubes.

    The chart table to starboard has a very complete array of sophisticated navigation and communications equipment, a pet area of interest for the Owner.

    The saloon has water and fuel tanks below the berths, with a pilot berth to port and entertainment and storage areas to starboard. The table hides the hydraulic actuator for the “feeler” dagger-board.

    The Owner’s cabin is forward of the main bulkhead, and has a head en suite, with a bureau and hanging locker space to starboard.

    The 50hp Yanmar engine and all ancillary equipment is below the cockpit with service access from all sides.

    The interior is finished in white with doors, drawers and lockers of butternut with ash trim. Ceilings are butternut and the sole is walnut with maple splines. There are no tropical hardwoods on the boat. Handrails on deck are stainless steel.

    “Quadrille” is a highly-developed combination of cruising comfort and good performance.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Quadrille Sailplan (click for .pdf)

    Quadrille Composite Plan (click for .pdf)

     


  3. Gray Wolf

    by Ross Weene

     

    The Design

    The objective of “Gray Wolf’s” design was to combine a classical appearance with thoroughly modern performance. As a custom design, she was developed for an experienced owner who has circumnavigated and raced trapeze dinghies.

    She benefits from this valuable input as well as our own experience designing BOC-type Open Class racers, fast, seaworthy cruisers, racing dinghies and America’s Cup work. “Gray Wolf’s” success is the result of a hard-won pedigree!

    Her combination of looks and performance has touched a nerve in sailors who felt they had to settle for old-fashioned performance in a classic-looking yacht. Fortunately, this is simply not the case! While “Gray Wolf” has some performance “additives,” her speed and seakindliness are simply the result of clean, modern design, unhindered by restrictive rating rules. Computers and Velocity Prediction Programs allowed us to run a systematic series of hull, rig and appendage variations to find the best combination for the boat’s displacement and purpose, much as we would do for a racing boat program. Twelve variations were run through the V.P.P. before the final hull was chosen.

    The resulting hull form is powerful with easy sections, a fine entry for penetrating waves and a broad, fair run aft.

    This computer work also allowed us to study her hull shape and flotation characteristics at various heeled sailing angles so that we could ensure she would feel balanced on the helm and track well. It is simply not possible to do this with hand drawn shapes, or with computers if you don’t know what to look for!

    Cockpit and interior space requirements were balanced against the aesthetics of her profile, sheer and freeboard to reach the best combination of form and function. Getting this balance ‘right’ separates an inspired design from one that might sail as well, but not give the owner the elements of pride and satisfaction that this design has provided. All these elements must evolve together for the design to be successful as a whole.

    Construction

    “Gray Wolf’s” original brief was that she be built of wood, partly for ‘historic’ reasons, and because her owner wanted to race in the modern class of the classic-boat race series on the East Coast of the U.S.

    Steve Koopman, Naval Architect and Marine Engineer at Rodger Martin Yacht Designs, engineered eight 2′ X 2′ panels, designed to be the same weight, for testing by Gougeon Brothers. Seven of these panels were wood in various combinations, and one glass-composite panel was designed as a benchmark, as most of our experience is in this material.

    The panels were tested on Gougeon’s panel-testing machine and the 1″ strip-planked Western Red Cedar panel with light biased cloth running across the seams proved most efficient (i.e. strongest and stiffest for its weight) of the wood panels, second to the glass-composite panel.

    All frames, (on 3’6″ centers,) floors and longitudinals are laminated mahogany, resulting in a stiff, strong and attractive wooden structure. Carbon caps reinforce the keel-floors against grounding loads. Decking is plywood over closer-spaced wooden deckbeams. A fibreglass sump, integrated into the hull, supports the stainless steel keelfin, which is tipped by a low-drag lead bulb. The rudder is well aft and deep, with a carbon stock.

    “Gray Wolf” is thoroughly engineered and immensely strong.

    Layout

    The arrangement plan shows a simple, spacious interior. In line with her use as a day racer and for short-handed racing, her interior is not filled with lockers that long term cruising would require. She is open from the companionway aft, with a quarter berth to starboard, and a big nav. table forward of that with a full setup of navigation and communications electronics. Opposite, to port, there is a good galley, open underneath where cruisers might put lockers and more drawers, but excellent for her current use, and with a big ice box aft. You can see the clear windows of the waterballast tanks outboard.

    A ring-frame separates the galley and nav. areas from the saloon which has wide comfortable settee/berths with fuel and water tankage beneath them. The 3-cylinder Yanmar saildrive is under the base of the drop-leaf table. A seat extends abaft the table, ideal for donning boots or talking to the cook or navigator. Batteries are forward of the engine in the same box, and access is excellent.

    The main mast-supporting bulkhead is forward of the settees, with an opening to the head to port. A short passage to starboard, with a big hanging locker outboard, leads to the comfortable forward berth. A ring-bulkhead separates this from the forepeak/anchor locker.

    The hull, where visible, is varnished. The rest of the interior is painted white with varnished trim on the ring-frames and bulkheads. The underside of the house is white-painted tongue-and-groove pine, and the house sides and sole are varnished. Cushions are dark green. A very pleasant, cool, airy interior.

    The layout on deck favours a long, spacious cockpit; as desirable for racing as it is for cruising, and wide unrestricted side decks, an advantage of the beam at deck and lack of side stays. The cockpit is 12 feet long and has seats wide and long enough to sleep on. A foot brace on the sole makes the wide cockpit comfortable at the low heel angles at which “Gray Wolf” sails. Coamings outboard make adequate backrests, but are low enough for sitting outboard, steering with a tiller-extension.

    Sail Plan

    An unstayed carbon rig was chosen for “Gray Wolf’s” original design as it was in keeping with the clean simplicity of the whole concept. The mast is stepped further aft in the boat than the typical ‘catboat’ use of the rig. While it is ‘unstayed,’ running backstays are used for tensioning the headstay, which, atypically, can fly 120% or 150% genoas. In very light airs, a big light drifter/reacher is flown (on its own furler) from the end of the bowsprit. An asymmetrical spinnaker is flown from the same point.

    The mainsail is large in proportion to the foretriangle, with roach unrestricted because there is no backstay. A long traveler is necessary to control the mainsail, and the natural bend of the mast automatically depowers the main in gusts. Reef lines and main halyard are run to the cockpit. This is a generous, handy rig.

    Performance

     “Gray Wolf” is fast for her size. She should be; she has a clean, proven hull-form with powerful, easy sections, a big sailplan, low wetted surface and high ballast and form stability. These factors would make her fast even without waterballast, but that adds a further level of sail-carrying power. Without waterballast, she would simply be reefed earlier. This type of boat does not sail at high heel angles, and so is inherently more comfortable to sail than older, narrower and heavier boats. Power from the sails is easily transformed into forward motion because of low drag and efficient appendages. This is a modern boat and repays being sailed well. She articulates her needs clearly. If the helm loads up, you let the traveler down. If she feels over-pressed, you reef. The foretriangle is moderate, and for most conditions the 120% genoa is all you need; reefing and unreefing the main keeps her on her feet and sailing fast.

    Windward racing ability of the unstayed rig was an initial concern, so great effort was put into making the boat as weatherly as possible. As we had expected, we have to foot rather than point, but our speed made good to windward is as good as some larger, weatherly high-performance boats, though we achieve this sailing at about 30 degrees apparent wind angle to their 27 degrees in a given condition.

    Once we crack off the wind, the comparison is less kind! “Gray Wolf” has sailed at 12.6 knots in about 16 knots of wind on a spinnaker reach. At this point we start to race with boats 20 or 30 feet longer than us. It truly is fun! ( At least for “Gray Wolf.”)

    A design of this refinement takes an owner with vision, an understanding of boats and the ability to pay for the dream to be realised, both in design and construction.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Gray Wolf Sailplan ( click for .pdf )

    Gray Wolf Composite Plan ( click for .pdf )


  4. Quest 30 / 33

    March 5, 2012 by Ross Weene

     

    The Quest 33 is a superb example of a fast contemporary “club racer” in which a family can comfortably cruise, and win ’round-the-buoys or point-to-point races under PHRF. These boats are Open Designs, and are not based on any restrictive rules! The Quest 33 is a development of the successful Quest 30, designed by us and built by Holby Marine Co.

    The Quest 33 offers a finer entry for increased upwind speed, a longer waterline for greater speed all ’round and larger interior and cockpit spaces. The extended, open stern looks good and facilitates swimming and boarding from a dinghy.

    SAILPLAN

    This is a proven fast sailplan in PHRF, fast coastal passages & even in the Singlehanded TransAtlantic Race! while for cruising the boat has all the power you need from the mainsail & 100% jib. The ingenious bowsprit shoots out at the pull of a line for setting the asymmetrical spinnaker. Wide traveler, vang and halyard give infinite tuning power to the mainsail.

    DECK

    The deck is securely surrounded by a built-in ‘recessed’ toerail. The cockpit measures a vast 11’6″ long, and works equally well with a wheel or tiller, for cruising or for racing. The jib-furler is recessed under the foredeck and just aft is an anchor locker with a hinged cover . Next is the forehatch on the forward end of the deckhouse. The seahood at the forward end of the main companionway hatch doubles as a line-cover for the controls running aft from the mast to the house-top winches. At the aft end of the cockpit there are two large lockers under the seats plus a large centre locker under the cockpit sole.

    DOWN BELOW

    The Quest 33 has a very spacious well-ventilated interior, especially roomy for a boat of this size. Start aft, with a palatial aft berth with plenty of airspace over it. It is huge. You can sleep North-South or East-West. Then, at the base of the companionway, there is the galley to port, with 2-burner stove with oven, ice-box & sink with stowage below, & outboard.

    To starboard, a complete enclosed head with full headroom & wet gear area. Then, further forward on the starboard side, the navigation area, served from the saloon seat. Now you’re in the saloon proper with comfortable full-sized seat/berths (6’6″ long) with good seat backs and an optional drop-leaf table in between. This is a pleasant area for dining & socializing & a great off-watch area while sailing.

    Forward of the saloon, through an arced bulkhead there is an area of storage shelves & lockers on each side and then the forward double berth, once again with much air & light. Plenty of foot-space at the forward end, as there is a separate forepeak/chain locker up there. The Quest 33 can be enjoyed as much for its interior as for its sailing abilities.

    CONSTRUCTION

    All Quest 33s are built using a licensed resin infusion system. This provides the best possible production laminate quality. Vinyl Ester resins assure resistance to blistering & have superior properties to polyesters. One of the Quests built to this system has done a double Transatlantic in 5 weeks under racing conditions. Holby quality is everywhere in evidence.

    PERFORMANCE

    The Quest 33 is faster than many boats 5 & 10 feet longer! This boat is a PHRF winner! The sailplan is highly refined and easy to use & adapt, and the fin-keel & rudder are the latest, thin, high-aspect foil designs.

    The design is based on the same principals as the Open Class ’round the world BOC racers & is unspoiled by slavish following of arcane ‘racing’ rules. These are called ‘handicaps’ for good reason! Yet a family cruising with ease will make very fast trips from port to port, & have the pleasure of gliding by bigger boats during a daysail.

    SUMMARY

    The Quest 33 provides sportboat-like performance in a stable, easy-to-sail boat with generous cruising space in the cockpit and interior.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Quest 33 Sailplan

    Quest33 Composite Plan

    Quest33 Polars

    Quest33 Ockam Data

     


  5. Aerodyne 38

    by Ross Weene

     

    For information on new boats visit Aerodyne Yachts Ltd

    For Robert Perry’s article in Sailing Magazine:  http://www.sailingmagazine.net/component/content/article/3-perry-on-design/45-aerodyne-38?directory=138

     

    THE DESIGN  

    Aerodyne Technology has been building high level composite structures for the aircraft, space , defence & boat industries for the last 15 years, and bring this high-quality expertise to the Aerodyne 38. Aerodyne’s brief for their new Aerodyne 38 was for a fast easy-to-sail ‘cruiser / racer’ with comfortable accommodations. Cockpit size and interior space are carefully balanced to achieve this dual role. Good performance was high on the priority list.

    The result is an attractive, easily handled, contemporary ‘club racer’ with plenty of space on deck and a lot of volume down below. This type of hull-form combines very good reserve stability with low wetted surface; a boat that sails well across the wind range. She sails at low heel angles, which improves both comfort and the efficiency of the rig and foils. On the performance side the design is influenced by developments in both Open Class BOC types and fast ’round-the-buoys designs, not handicapped by restrictive ‘rating’ rules. The Aerodyne 38 also benefits from our experience with successful long-distance custom cruising yachts.

    THE SAILPLAN

    The Aerodyne 38 has a well-proportioned fractional rig set well back in the boat to balance the full-triangle (non-overlapping) jib’s size with that of the main. We have now designed several boats with this rig, and can assure that it is easy to handle efficiently for a given size and much easier to tack than a rig with large, overlapping genoas, and works over a much wider wind range; between drifting and 24 knots true. It is not coincidental that BOC-type rigs have developed in this direction. The jib furling drum is recessed below the deck so it is as efficient for racing as it is for cruising, and the big mainsail, which features single-line reefing, has a long traveler to allow its power to be easily controlled.

    Shrouds are outboard at the hull for strength and better staying angles. This allows a lighter mast and rigging. The Aerodyne 38 will sail well under mainsail alone.

    ON DECK

    The Aerodyne 38’s cockpit is 11.5 ft (3.5m) long! Not only is it well laid out for a racing crew, but in cruising mode adds considerable outdoor living space and yet will drain quickly through the transom should a sea come aboard. The cockpit seats are wide and long enough to sleep on.

    The wheel is large to allow steering from the side-deck, and well-placed foot-cleats are provided for the helmsman when standing behind the wheel. There is also a cleat down the centre of the “crew” cockpit for bracing when sailing upwind, and the space between the seats, over 3 ft. (1m), is wide enough for a good cockpit table. There is a big locker to port, and cooking gas is in a dedicated locker to starboard, aft.

    All sail controls lead aft to rope-clutches and winches on the cabin top. Main halyard, reefing, vang, spinnaker halyard, headsail furling, bowsprit and spinnaker controls are all handled from here. The bowsprit retracts into a waterproof housing, with service access down below.

    Going forward, the side-decks are wide and unobstructed, helped by the outboard shrouds, and the anchor is stowed in its own flush locker, which also houses the recessed jib-furling drum.

    The Aerodyne 38 has an innovative recessed toerail running around the perimeter of the entire deck giving a secure footing, and making it comfortable for hiking out.

    An optional dodger protects the forward part of the cockpit.

    DOWN BELOW

    The Aerodyne 38 has a well-lit, comfortable interior with excellent ventilation. The drawings show the layout, with double cabins forward and aft, each with their own hanging lockers and stowage areas.

    The saloon has settee-berths either side, with lockers and shelves outboard. Six can sit around the drop-leaf table, which has bottle storage in the centre section.

    At the base of the companionway, the head, with sink, lockers and foul-weather gear stowage is to port, and a well-ventilated, comfortable aft cabin is to starboard. The ‘C’- shaped galley is forward of the aft cabin, with a double sink on centreline over the engine generous drawers, and an ice-box outboard. There are lockers above the two-burner stove/oven. This is a good seagoing galley.

    There is a full-size nav. station opposite the galley, with a chart locker, recess for a lap-top computer, drawers, storage under the seat. The electrical panel and electronics are outboard, where they are easy to see and use. Tools and a waste bin are kept under the companionway steps.

    CONSTRUCTION

    The entire Aerodyne 38 is built of Epoxy resin, the best material for composite boat construction, and considerably stronger, tougher and more durable than the polyester or vinyl ester resins used in conventional production boat hulls. This, combined with directional E-glass fabrics, high quality core materials appropriate for each area and Carbon-fibre reinforced structural framing ensures high strength, stiffness and longevity associated with one-off custom boats. Similarly, the Aerodyne 38 is painted with an Awlgrip finish which gives a tougher, high-gloss finish than gel-coat.

    SYSTEMS

    The Aerodyne 38 engine is a Yanmar 3GM (27 bhp) Saildrive, positioned in the middle of the boat for best weight distribution and excellent service access. Fuel is under the starboard settee, aft, with one fresh water tank ahead of it, and another to port, forward of the batteries. Capacities are: 25 gallons (95 litres) of fuel; 50 gallons (190 litres) of water.

    PERFORMANCE

    The Aerodyne 38 is designed for fast sailing! She has high form-stability, excellent power-to-weight ratio (SA/Displ=30.13!), long waterline (Disp/L=117), a fine entry for wave penetration, and ‘planing’ sections aft for easy surfing. Keel and rudder are carefully proportioned for excellent control and upwind ability. Extensive Computer Velocity Prediction studies show that the Aerodyne 38 has the satisfying ability to sail faster than boats five or ten feet longer, boat for boat!

    The Aerodyne 38 is fast, stable, easy and fun to sail and has a great cockpit and interior for cruising and racing. We think that handsome, contemporary looks add to the appeal!

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    A38 Sailplan

    A38 Composite

    A38 Polars

    A38 Ockam Data

     


  6. Aerodyne 43

    by Ross Weene

     

    For information on new boats visit Aerodyne Yachts Ltd

    THE DESIGN

    The Aerodyne 43 has provided us with a great opportunity to develop a bigger sister to the very successful Aerodyne 38, and the spirit of that popular boat is maintained in one that has about 40% more volume and retains the simple, efficient low-load, non-overlapping sailplan, easily accessible performance with a much more spacious cruising interior styled & finished to complement a larger yacht.

    Aesthetically, we tried to give this new, bigger Aerodyne a sleeker more sophisticated look (as befits a bigger sister!) and there is an ‘edge’ to the styling of the house with the defining crease and with careful attention to edges and radii throughout the boat. Aerodyne 43 was designed with the help of a sophisticated modeling program, SolidWorks, expertly run by John Fox, of FCS Design. This program has raised design accuracy & aesthetic control to a higher plane & allowed us to pass on the Aerodyne Marine plans that can be executed by numerically controlled (CNC) milling machines and routers, resulting in a very fair, accurately built boat.

    This 43 has ‘legs’ and will cover ground fast and comfortably with her long waterline and fine ends. Her hull form is a development of the unrestricted design of the Aerodyne 38’s, though with more of an eye to fast, easy-motion passage-making, without compromising her ability to ‘break away’ and sail easily at speeds above her hull speed, even single- or short-handed, as well as around the buoys with a full crew. This type of hull-form combines reserve stability with low wetted surface; a boat that sails well, across the wind range. Her Limit of Positive Stability (LPS) is calculated to exceed both European Union requirements and those of U. S. offshore races such as the Newport-Bermuda race.

    The chosen hull-form is the result of researching eighteen hulls in our Velocity Prediction Program. Looking for a fast all-rounder. The Aerodyne 43 is designed to be seaworthy and fast on her own terms; she is not compromised to meet ever-shifting artificial handicap rules.

    Structural design improvements following Open Class (Globe 60s) practices have allowed for slimmer appendages with higher factors of safety, improving both upwind & downwind performance. Our keel-bulb designs benefit directly from intensive America’s Cup research and practice through our work on ACC campaigns.

    Owners of the Aerodyne 38′ will recognize strong genes from their boats in the 43. Enthusiasm & feedback from these owners have been heard and acted on. At the dock or at anchor, the comfort of the interior will surprise those who see these Aerodynes only as ‘racers’.

    THE SAILPLAN

    The Aerodyne 43 has a well-proportioned fractional rig set well back in the boat to balance the full-triangle (non-overlapping) jib’s size with that of the main. We have now designed many boats with this rig, and can assure that it is easy to handle efficiently for a given size and much easier to tack than a rig with large, overlapping genoas, and works over a much wider wind range; between drifting and 24 knots true. It is not coincidental that BOC-type rigs have developed in this direction. The jib furling drum is recessed below the deck so it is as efficient for racing as it is for cruising, and the big mainsail, which features single-line reefing, has a long, radiused traveler to allow its power to be easily controlled.

    Asymmetrical spinnakers can easily be flown from our highly developed, simply controlled retractable Carbon bowsprit. All control lines lead aft (under the foredeck) to housetop jammers and winches. With spinnaker sleeves, these sails can easily be flown by a couple & are standard practice for singlehanders. Unlike other boats with retractable sprits, ours is fully enclosed in a special, drained housing below so that the forward cabin is kept dry.

    Shrouds are outboard at the hull for greater strength and better staying angles. This allows a lighter mast and rigging as well as keeping wide, clear side decks. The Aerodyne 43 will sail well under mainsail alone.

    ON DECK

    The Aerodyne 43 cockpit is nearly 12 feet (3.6m) long! And comfortably wide for both racing & cruising (it will easily accommodate an optional table) and has a footrest for bracing when the boat heels. The cockpit seats are wide and long enough to sleep on, and the backrests are high enough for comfort and raise the winches to a good height for good leverage.

    The wheel is large to allow easy steering from the side-deck, and well-placed foot-cleats are provided for the helmsman when standing behind the wheel. There is also an optional helmsman’s seat, which can be raised on either side to allow access to the open transom. There is a big locker to port, aft, and cooking gas is in a dedicated locker to starboard, aft. A huge lazarette is reached through the port cockpit seat.

    All sail controls lead aft to rope-clutches and winches on the cabin top. Main halyard, reefing, vang, spinnaker halyard, headsail furling, bowsprit and spinnaker controls are all handled from here. The bowsprit retracts into a waterproof housing, with service access down below.

    Going forward, the side-decks are wide and unobstructed, helped by the outboard shrouds, and the anchor is stowed in its own flush locker, which also houses the recessed jib-furling drum and optional anchor windlass.

    The Aerodyne 43 has an innovative recessed toerail running around the perimeter of the entire deck giving a secure footing, and making it comfortable for hiking out.

    An optional dodger protects the forward part of the cockpit.

    DOWN BELOW

    The Aerodyne 43 has a highly-styled, well-lit, very spacious and comfortable interior with excellent ventilation and a relaxed use of space. Zimbabwe teak, a beautiful renewable African hardwood has been used sparingly but effectively in what is a lightweight ergonomically designed space. The drawings show the layout, with double cabins forward and aft, each with their own hanging lockers, shelves and generous stowage areas. The forward cabin has a washbasin, vanity area and comfortable seat to starboard. To port there is a hanging locker & chest of drawers.

    The saloon has settee-berths either side, with lockers and shelves outboard, large storage behind the seatbacks and water, fuel and storage under the seats. Six can sit around the drop-leaf table, which has bottle storage in the centre section.

    At the base of the companionway, to port, the head has a generous, well-ventilated shower stall with a seat, as well as a sink, lockers and foul-weather gear stowage. To starboard there is a well-ventilated, comfortable aft cabin with generous changing space, hanging locker, drawers in the chest and under the berth, and lockers over a shelf, outboard. There are also bins inboard of the berth, near the centreline. And long term storage under the berth.

    This is a both a sailor’s and a cook’s galley. There is a centreline peninsular with an underfitted double sink over the engine. It has a built-in chopping board and trash bin hatch. Double and split drawers fill the section joining the peninsular to the outboard fridge and freezer, which have both top and front face doors. There are lockers outboard above the two-burner propane stove/oven, which has pot-and-pan storage beneath it.

    The nav. station is opposite the galley and has a comfortable seagoing seat with storage under it, plenty of instrument space as well as space for a laptop computer, nav. books and the electrical panel. Tools are kept under the companionway steps.

    CONSTRUCTION

    The Aerodyne 43 is very accurately constructed with the use of computer-sculpted tooling. The hull and structure are heat-cured, vacuum-bagged Epoxy resin, (the best material for composite hull construction) load-directional E-glass fabrics and high quality Core-Cell core. Vinyl-Ester resin is used for the deck and for its own structural advantages (it also allows deck-mould detail and colour to be transferred)

    The Aerodyne 43’s hull is painted with Awlcraft 2000 paint, which gives the best protection for the hull. Interior bulkheads and ‘furniture’ are, in most instances, used as structural members and are placed strategically. This gives these boats a monocoque structure and makes them feel as strong as they are. This is custom race boat structure in a fine production boat.

    Rudderstock is Carbon-fibre, as is the optional Carbon, Hall spar.

    SYSTEMS

    The Aerodyne 43’s engine is a Yanmar 3JH3, 40 bhp Sail Drive, positioned in the middle of the boat, beneath the galley sink-island for best weight distribution and excellent service access on all four sides! Fuel is under the starboard settee, aft, with one fresh water tank ahead of it, and another to port, forward of the batteries. Standard capacities are: 35 gallons (130 litres) of fuel; 80 gallons (300 litres) of water. An optional, additional, long-range fuel tank is available under the saloon berth, and an optional long-range water tank can also be ordered, located under the forward double berth. The holding tank is abaft the head compartment. There is a dedicated ‘Systems Space’ for pumps, through-hulls, exhaust water-trap, extra batteries, etc. at the foot of the companionway steps, for easy access and convenient serviceability. As with the engine, convenient serviceability for engine and systems translates directly to reliable, trouble-free sailing.

    PERFORMANCE

    The Aerodyne 43 is a mile eater! Just take a look at her polar diagram! It translates to high-performance sailing at all wind angles, and her unstressed sailplan and rig allow fast sailing without the necessity to ‘tweak,’ for cruisers; and the rewards of tweaking for racers. Her highly efficient rudder and fine keel make for a proven combination that is strong in directional stability (and easy on autopilots.) The efficiency of these appendages, combined with a carefully-balanced hull-form also make for a boat that is a pleasure to steer & control.

    Aerodyne 43 has high form-stability, a high power-to-weight ratio, a long waterline, fine entry for wave penetration, and ‘planing’ sections aft for easy surfing. The Aerodyne 43 is fast, stable, easy and fun to sail for singlehanders, couples or racing crews, and has a great cockpit and interior for cruising and racing. Handsome, sophisticated looks, inside and out, add to the appeal! A true cruiser/racer.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Aerodyne 43 Sailplan

    Aerodyne 43 Composite Plan

    Aerodyne 43 Polars

    Aerodyne 43 Ockam Data

     


  7. 42′ Custom Daysailer – Version B

    February 24, 2012 by Ross Weene

     

    HYBRID PROPULSION, LIFTING KEEL

    The propulsion system is unique and brand new technology – a parallel-hybrid drive allowing the boat to be motored, either under electric power with a 10 kw (13.4 bhp) electric motor or with a 30 bhp (22.4 kw) diesel. Power is delivered through a fixed-3-blade propeller on a retractable shaft.

    The boat is intended to sail in remote and interesting parts of the world, so her draft is reducible from 8’ (2.44 m) to 6’ (1.83 m) while underway, with the keel lifting mechanism contained within the saloon table base.

    Though primarily to be used as a daysailer, there are two cabins below, a small galley and head and a comfortable saloon.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    42′ CUSTOM VER.B SAILPLAN

    42′ CUSTOM VER B COMPOSITE


  8. 42′ Custom Daysailor

    February 6, 2012 by Ross Weene

     

    BESPOKE DESIGN

    A 42’ (12.8 m) LOA daysailer.  She is to be a test-bed and showcase for environmentally-responsible technology and, where possible, materials.

     

    HINTS OF THE PAST BUT NOT RETRO

    The exterior design is inspired by American & European workboats and early yachts.  Influences come from pilot boats, English cutters and the vertical-sided curved houses of early 19th century American workboats and yachts.  There is also a bulwark forward of the mast, and retractable bowsprit for asymmetric spinnaker.  None of these compromises the boat’s primary use as a daysailer, designed to appeal to the visual and tactile senses.

     

    HYBRID PROPULSION, LIFTING KEEL, KALEIDESCOPE GLASS SHOWER

    The propulsion system is unique and brand new technology – a parallel-hybrid drive allowing the boat to be motored, either under electric power with a 10 kw (13.4 bhp) electric motor or with a 30 bhp (22.4 kw) diesel. Power is delivered through a fixed-3-blade propeller on a retractable shaft.

    The boat is intended to sail in remote and interesting parts of the world, so her draft is reducible from 8’ (2.44 m) to 6’ (1.83 m) while underway, with the keel lifting mechanism contained within the saloon table base.

    Though primarily to be used as a daysailer, there are two cabins below, a small galley and head and a comfortable saloon. Also a shower: a 3’ diameter glass tube that runs right through the boat from its glass deck hatch to the glass bottom conforming to the hull. This is not only a shower but a ‘light refractor.’  It will reflect and refract light from above and below all around the interior of the boat’s light wood interior sourced from North & South American woods, and with soft, cool fabrics on cushions and pillows.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    42′ CUSTOM SAILPLAN

    42′ CUSTOM COMPOSITE PLAN