1. Caribbean 33

    February 3, 2017 by Ross Weene

    ALL AT SEA” Article

    Sea Hawk Paints / Hawk Epoxy Article

    Grenada Marine’s Website

     

    207-C33-PUBLICATION-SAILPLA

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    CARIBBEAN 33 SAILPLAN & DECKPLAN 


  2. VX EVO

    by Ross Weene

    http://bennettyachting.com/vx-evo/

    Sailing World “Best Dinghy” 2017

    Sail Magazine “Best Performance Boat Under 30′” 2017

    Utilizing laminates of Carbon, E glass and foam cores together with advanced epoxy resins the Evo is a tough yet light platform and should provide many years of racing performance.

    The kick up rudder and dagger-board configuration was chosen for launching in any location.

    The rig is all carbon and tuned to three mainsail plans, then controlled when off the wind with a calibrated shroud only system to provide Gennaker support without compromising the easiest of high-speed Jibes.

    The Evo will offer not just strict One-design racing but also a platform for any “crew’d big boat sailor” wishing to master apparent wind sailing with independence from his regular team. Sail any time you want from ramp or beach.

    The core principle is that the sailor gets to sail what is, within an affordable price, the most technology for the dollar available anywhere on the market today. Simply put, a “Big bang for the buck”.

     


  3. MX Next

    October 11, 2013 by Ross Weene

     

    Click here for MX Next brochure

    Click here for MX Next website

     

     


  4. Airco Distributor

    March 28, 2012 by Ross Weene

     

    50 foot racing boat in which Mike Plant won Class II in the 1986/87 B.O.C. single-handed around the world race. Held Class Record in the 1988 OSTAR. Has done 15 transatlantics and three B.O.C.’s (Mike Plant; Josh Hall; Niah Vaughan) and currently preparing for her FOURTH Around Alone under Mark Taylor.


  5. Johnson 18

    March 6, 2012 by Ross Weene

     

    PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS

    Length Overall – 18′-0″
    Length on Waterline – 16′-7′
    Beam extreme – 6′-7″
    Hull weight – 350 lbs
    Crew weight – 275-325 lbs
    Sail area (Main 139 sq.ft – Jib 58 sq.ft) – 197 sq.ft
    Asymmetrical spinnaker – 150 sq.ft Draught (board up) – 41/2″
    Draught (board down) – 4′-6″
    Displacement/Length ratio – 68
    Sail Area/Displacement ratio – 40

    Special features

    Single rudder (kick-up)
    Centerboard
    Outboard chainplates
    Carbon-fiber retracting bowsprit
    Simple controls
    No sharp edges
    160 lb person on rail heels boat only 8 degrees

    JOHNSON 18 SAILPLAN (PDF)

    JOHNSON 18 DECKPLAN (PDF)

     


  6. Rampant

    January 30, 2012 by Ross Weene

     

    THE CONCEPT

    A sportboat set apart from other sportboats –

    LIGHT & FAST – Stiff with 4-5 crew, slippery in light air, and sport-boat planing ability
    FUN – No rules. This is a ‘One Design’ or PHRF speed machine for racing in protected waters.
    TACTICAL – ROTATING KEEL – speed with pointing ability upwind
    UNIQUE – A ‘32 foot boat with a 4 foot bow,’ from which to fly an asymmetrical spinnaker and code-0, thus avoiding the weight & complexity of a retracting sprit.
    VERSATILE – Keel lifts to get to yacht club hoists and to go on a trailer. Beam under 11 feet (it is 10’ 11”) so it can be towed in the US without an escort.  Lifting rudder for the same reason.

    ADD’L CHARACTERISTICS

    Ballast ~ 2240 lbs. (foil & bulb)
    Sail Area ~ 700 sq.ft
    S.A. / Disp Ratio ~ 43 (lightship)
    S.A. / Disp Ratio ~ 37 (crewed)
    D / L Ratio @ Lt. Ship ~ 48
    D / L Ratio, crewed ~ 58

    DESIGN ELEMENTS
    How do you make a planing hull go upwind better? Increase lift and reduce drag! An innovative feature of the Diode 36 is the rotating carbon keel. The ability to align the rotating keel closer to the longitudinal shape of the heeled waterlines, allowing for leeway, reduces drag for the lift provided from both keel and heeled hull. In addition the upwind heeled waterlines have been carefully sculpted to keep the heeled canoebody symmetrical, and no more than about 5 degrees off the centerline. The result: exceptional upwind speeds and angles for a superlight boat. Pointing with other IMS boats, Diode is sailing upwind at 7.2-7.3 knots, which is exceptional for a 36 foot sportboat of her type, and easily exceeding our own continuously refined VPP’s.

    The Diode 36 is a “crossover” boat incorporating both dinghy and keelboat characteristics. Fine waterlines forward and deep forefoot provide wave-piercing and upwind efficiency. Waterline length is maximized for speed, hull sections are rounded for low wetted surface, and sections aft are wide for offwind planing. The waterplane is very narrow keeping wetted surface low, and there is great flare in the topsides to keep the limited crew as far outboard as the beam limit allows.

    The hull has generous rocker for control over fore-and-aft trim, and to turn quickly. When the hull is upright, the ends are well out of the water; when the boat is heeled upwind, the forefoot ‘ rolls-in’ giving the bow enough bite to resist its being blown to leeward. Similarly, when the spinnaker is up, the bow rises keeping the forefoot well clear of the water, the prismatic high and the rudder well-immersed. The high rocker also allows the boat to slide more easily ‘off-axis’ off the wind with the keel down to leeward a couple of degrees. Off the wind, we have seen 15 in about 20 knots true, and these are the early days!

    ROTATING / LIFTING CARBON KEEL
    The global goal was to make our keel perform the same function as a gybing centerboard, and so we looked often at the 505 dinghy, which can be built with a gybing centerboard, for ideas and inspiration. A rotating inner drum contains the keel fin itself and is supported on two Ertalyte (PET-P plastic with excellent wear resistance, a low coefficient of friction, high strength) bearings within the fixed outer drum. The inner drum is retained by a flange resting on an Orkot (low friction composite) thrust bearing, and set up to be rotated by winch handles through port & starboard Antal line drivers leading to multiple purchase and then to the drum. The keel angle controls are located aft so that the skipper or main trimmer can play them. The keel turns easily and accurately when underway, and upwind we are seeing it perform exactly as anticipated, giving us speed with height.

    The keel can be lifted with an A-frame and tackle that leads aft to the mainsheet winches. Once the keel is up, it can be pinned for motoring and hoisting, and for setting the boat on its trailer.

    ENGINEERING & CONSTRUCTION
    A major benefit of using concentric drums to fix the keel is load distribution – even with the 9’ draft, there is 25% bury to the fin cantilever which translates to manageable side loads taken to hull and cockpit sole, which did not have to be overly reinforced. Keel floors are also not required, keeping weight down. Forward of the mast is a delta bulkhead, spanning out to the composite chainplates – such structure is very efficient as it performs several functions; handling mast compression and inboard shroud tension, distributing the keel’s racking loads on the hull, and framing the forward edge of the cockpit and side tanks.

    Keeping weight low and construction costs down emphasized the necessity for efficient use of materials and structure. In response we used a thick (1” A500 & A550 Core Cell) core in the hull (3/4” for deck and cockpit), with biaxial E-glass skins engineered to be as thin as possible while meeting ABS requirements for strength and stiffness. Internal structure of frames and stringers is minimized. There two frames forward of the delta bulkhead, the forwardmost aligned with the headstay. Aft of the keel drum are two frames. Due to the hull’s thick core the only longitudinal structure are panels framing the outboard engine storage well aft of the keel drum, and small stringers forward under deck. The hull shape also contributes to the boat’s efficiency. Soft form transitions everywhere eliminate stress concentrations. Unavoidable sharp transitions, such as the hull / deck joint, are radiused and cored to ease stress and maintain stiffness from panel to panel. Overall the boat is extremely stiff and plays upwind through waves with imperceptible shudder and zero fuss.

    SAILPLAN
    The Diode 36’s sailplan has moderate aspect ratio, designed to keep the boat on her feet even sailing with a small crew. The carbon mast is designed as a light, simple rig that’s easy to control and can be stepped and unstepped quickly. Long, swept spreaders give a stable rig and allow for a large non-overlapping headsail. Chainplates located out at the rail reduce rig loading and keep the sailplan light. Additional weight is saved using Equiplite halyard lead blocks, small Harken Slider system, and Vectran runners.

    The first Diode 36, “Rampant” was built by New England Boatworks in Portsmouth, RI and launched September 17, 2004

    See her acticle in Seahorse International Sailing magazine January 2005.

    RAMPANT SAILPLAN

    RAMPANT COMPOSITE PLAN

    POLARS


  7. Class 40 “Icarus Racing”

    January 4, 2012 by Ross Weene

     

    “ICARUS RACING” – the first U.S. built Class-40

    Build of the boat is by Ted Brown and Stewart Wiley of Al Fresco Composites, Portsmouth, RI.

    To begin the design process we decided to test a series of hulls in a weather matrix for the race as well as a long-race performance predicition tool developed in-house by RMD. Class 40 is a ‘box rule,’ so we investigated one shape overtly maximized to the box. The other extreme was considerably narrower than the maximum, with a single rudder, lighter hull and a higher ballast-ratio, both to the minimum displacement. A third boat tested was between these extremes. For these three exploratory types, we used a ‘parent/child’ annex to our Velocity Prediction Program (VPP). This allows the boat to choose the location and amount of ballast (including ballast to leeward or empty) to give the boat its best performance in every wind strength and direction. Of course it doesn’t take into account sea conditions, exhaustion, broken gear and the indefinable issue of seakindliness. If it did, we could leave it all to the machines!

    To begin the design process we decided to test a series of hulls in a weather matrix for the race as well as a long-race performance predicition tool developed in-house by RMD. Class 40 is a ‘box rule,’ so we investigated one shape overtly maximized to the box. The other extreme was considerably narrower than the maximum, with a single rudder, lighter hull and a higher ballast-ratio, both to the minimum displacement. A third boat tested was between these extremes. For these three exploratory types, we used a ‘parent/child’ annex to our Velocity Prediction Program (VPP). This allows the boat to choose the location and amount of ballast (including ballast to leeward or empty) to give the boat its best performance in every wind strength and direction. Of course it doesn’t take into account sea conditions, exhaustion, broken gear and the indefinable issue of seakindliness. If it did, we could leave it all to the machines!

    An intuition that a subtle step further was needed, led to the final hull choice. It was faster in the weather matrix and RMD’s own RTW test by a greater margin than all the others. We were on our way and sent the surface files to Goetz Custom for computer cutting. Design partner, Ross Weene has worked wonders (and long hours) to complete this program efficiently and accurately.

    Spars are by Halls Spars of Bristol, RI.  Sails are North 3Di. Steve Koopman, Dirk Kramers’ partner in SDK Structures has worked with Ross to engineer advanced light, durable hull and appendage structures with materials from Rich O’Meara’s ROM Composites of Newport.

    This is not only an all-out US entry into Class 40 and ocean racing arena, but an all-Rhode Island entry too.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ICARUS RACING SAILPLAN (pdf)

    ICARUS RACING COMPOSITE PLAN (pdf)


  8. Custom Carbon Sportboat “Bella”

    January 3, 2012 by Ross Weene

     

    A full-on integration of a large sailplan , hiking racks, and “skiff” platform – a rocket of a boat...

    OVERVIEW

    This custom carbon sportboat is currently under construction in Rhode Island.  She is largely being homebuilt.  Her builders formerly owned a Kiwi 35, which was unfortunately struck by another boat in a storm and lost during Key West. Race Week.  Rodger Martin Design had been involved for about 5 years helping optimize the dated Kiwi into a performance-oriented successful raceboat, work including replacing the old spar with a carbon  Mumm 30 rig,  replacing symmetric spinnaker with asymmetric, and aluminum hiking racks (weight savings of approx. 400#).  She was lost just as her speed was peaking – but fortunately the rig, hardware, some sails, and lead ballast were salvaged.

    The new mission:  Design a better and faster boat, using the salvaged Mumm 30 rig.

     

    PERFORMANCE

    The boat has been optimized to perform with a full crew of 8-9 sitting out on the carbon hiking racks.  A 14′ beam (with racks) provides plenty of stability – necessary to keep the boat on its feet under the large sailplan!  With the racks removed she has an 8.5′ beam, for easy trailerability.  A lifting keel will allow for shallow water launching and easier transport as well.  

    The skiff hull shape reflects a fine entry with generous planing area aft.  A hard chine helps enable sweet planing shapes, and provides tracking and secondary stability.  We have studied, as we typically do, heeled hull shapes and designed the chine accordingly.   Upwind she should settle into a nice groove and easily punch through waves; off the wind in breeze, with the crew piled up aft on the racks, we don’t expect to see much of the boat in the water!

     

    CONSTRUCTION

    The sportboat is built of carbon pre-preg laminates over Divinycell HP foam core; a one-off built on a male mold.  Deck and cockpit are built up from flat panels, taped together.  The lifting keel is carbon.  Chainplates are composite, the racks are carbon tube, and down below there’s not much except for carbon framing, and some space for sail stowage.

     

    Click here for an article on “Bella” from DIAB Group, manufacturers of Divinycell core

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    “BELLA” COMPOSITE PLAN

     


  9. Speedream 27

    January 2, 2012 by Ross Weene

     

    Click here for MXSpeedDream webpage

     

    Video of sailing and flying keel:

     

    Video of boat leaving the shop:

     

     


  10. VX ONE – 2011 Sailing World Boat of the Year

    January 1, 2012 by Ross Weene

     

    http://bennettyachting.com/new-vx-one-page/

    www.vxonedesignracing.com/vxodr/

    Follow VX One on Facebook

    Concepts

    The core principle is that the sailor gets to sail what is, within an affordable price, the most technology for the dollar available anywhere on the market today. Simply put, a “Big bang for the buck”.

    The VX One Design offers:

    *Team Design Approach: The VX team includes lead design and concepts by Viper 640 designer, Brian Bennett, naval architecture and design engineering by Ross Weene and Rodger Martin, rig development and engineering by John Clinton and the Southern Spars team, and deck layout by Harken. The VX is designed with Multisurf  Yacht design software, 3D modeled with Rhinoceros, and VPP analysis by the Wolfson unit (UK) software. Hull tools will be cut with precision 5 axis CNC equipment for perfect geometry and replication.

    * Optimized Construction Techniques: The VX will be built using a conservative level of technology. Major components will be resin-infused with Vinylester and e glass with PVC cores, and Armorflex gelcoat. This is the most environmentally considerate approach to building a production boat and will provide a tough, durable craft, with optimal performance and longevity. Due to the 3-D design process, all parts and systems can be duplicated with precision and stocked for quick turnaround if needed. This will be a boat that will give many years of racing service.

    *ISAF One Design Development: The VX is being developed from the start using ISAF templates and guidelines to guarantee strict international design and build tolerances, and class management development.

    * Cost-down engineering: A difficult task requiring experience and an understanding of the dynamics involved in producing and marketing race boats, this is a process where we look carefully at the target market and competition to determine what we feel customers will pay for the finished product, and engineer the project from this figure backwards.

    * Logistics Efficiencies:  Sailing is an expensive sport and suffers from varying degrees of inefficiency. The VX is designed to consider the long-ranging impact of shipping and moving multiple boats and associated equipment efficiently. On initial delivery, the VX can be delivered 3 units per 20’ container, or 8 units per 40’ HC container. The hull is light enough to comfortably stack 3 high on a road single trailer. The Southern Spars Carbon rig is shipped in 2 pieces for easy handling and stocking.

     

    Click Here for Sailplan in PDF form